Is Divorce Promise-Breaking?

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Is Divorce Promise-Breaking?

 

Disagree

In Elizabeth’s book, she questions whether divorce is breaking a promise. She supports this conclusion with one primary reason that divorce is breaking a promise (Brake 21). I disagree with her on a few grounds. First, marriage vows are in written form and mostly they are recited as a norm. In my opinion, if it is a promise, the parties involved ought to speak the words that are from what they feel

Make a connection

In Elizabeth's book, she questions whether divorce is breaking a promise. She argues that vows relate to love are not promises (Brake 24). This perception relates to another class I was that was differentiating vows and promises. We went through that topic and I realized there is a big difference between making a vow and a promise. This is similar because a promise comes from within but a vow can be a procedure just like in the courtroom.

Raise a question

In Elizabeth’s book, she argues that vows concerning love are not promises (Brake 23). She explains that one cannot promise acts that are performed outsides one’s control while love involves state of mind. She supports this conclusion by stating that vows related to spousal roles complex due to diverse social understanding of marriage. I did not know what she meant because, from my knowledge, promises are personal decisions where social intelligence does not relate. However, I think Elizabeth might respond to me by stating that as much it emotions are the center of marriage, social understanding plays a critical role.

Give an example

In Elizabeth's book, she argues that a divorce is a serious moral wrong (Brake 27). She concludes this with one reason that when the spouses decide to divorce, they do more than was austerely essential in trying hard to protect the marriage. An example that supports Elizabeth’s conclusion is husband wants children but the wife finds it as an obstacle to her dream and so the husband decides to leave. This example supports Elizabeth's points because they both go beyond the vows they made.


 

Work Cited

Brake, Elizabeth. Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. Oxford UP, 2012.